terrasil eczema and psoriasis system
aidance scientific, makers of terrasil

The term “Eczema” refers to a group of rash-like skin conditions that affect 1 in 10 people globally. It most commonly affects children under the age of five and typically goes into remission in adulthood, but flare-ups can also happen later in life. It is believed to be passed down through genetics, and can be triggered by environmental factors and irritants.

Eczema is typically characterized by an itchy rash, but other symptoms can include:

  • Dry & Flaky skin
  • Rough leathery skin patches
  • Blisters or pimples
  • Lightening or darkening of skin pigmentation
  • Bleeding or oozing in severe cases

Eczema can appear anywhere on the body, but is most often found in children on the cheeks, forehead and scalp, and on the elbows, wrists, and behind the knees in older children and adults.

Eczema goes through cycles, so it is important to recognize signs of a flare-up early. Typically, it starts as an itch that eventually erupts into a rash when irritated. Once treated, the rash returns to normal, healthy skin.

Eczema is thought to be linked to an overactive response by the body’s immune system to a certain environmental irritant. It can be genetic, and is particularly common in families with a history of allergies or asthma.

A flare-up for someone who has eczema can be triggered by exposure to an irritant such as:

  • Temperature change
  • Certain fabrics
  • Pet dander
  • Excessive sweat
  • Soaps or detergents
  • Particular foods
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Stress

Eczema is in no way contagious from person to person and cannot be spread through contact.

Since there is no known cure for eczema, the primary goal of treating this condition is soothing the itching, dryness and inflammation that comes with a flare-up as quickly as possible.

Here are some things you can do to promote healing:

  • Frequent use of moisturizing lotion
  • Avoid sudden temperature changes
  • Avoid scratching
  • Reduce stress
  • Avoid rough fabrics
  • Avoid other environmental triggers and irritants

Making sure your skin is healthy, clean and moisturized, even in-between flare-ups, can reduce their frequency and severity. Daily moisturizing, especially after a warm shower or bath, can significantly decrease your chances of having a flare-up.

Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease that affects nearly 3% of the global population, though it is still considered a common skin condition. While it often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, it can affect anyone and can last for years, or be a lifelong issue. It is not known what actually causes psoriasis, but it is believed to be genetically linked and tends to run in families.

Psoriasis is typically characterized by the appearance of raised, red, scaly patches that are the result of an overproduction of skin cells. Several types of psoriasis exist, but plaque psoriasis is the most common. All types tend to share similar symptoms:

  • Raised red lesions
  • Silvery, scaly plaques
  • Itching, burning, and soreness
  • Cracked skin that may bleed
  • Joint pain and stiffness
  • Inflammation

Psoriasis can appear anywhere on the body, but tends to appear on the knees, elbows, torso, and scalp most often. It also can manifest on the face, hands, feet, and genitals.

Psoriasis requires a medical diagnosis, but is usually easy to spot. You should consult your doctor if you believe you have or may be developing psoriasis.

Psoriasis is thought to be linked to an overactive response by the body’s immune system to a certain trigger. Studies that have linked the prevalence of psoriasis to smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, and even obesity.

If you already have psoriasis, outbreaks can be triggered by certain factors. There are a few known triggers of psoriasis that are fairly common:

  • Stress and emotional trauma
  • Temperature change, often cold weather
  • Infection, anything that causes an immune response
  • Skin injuries like cuts, severe sunburns, bug bites, etc.
  • Certain medications like lithium, antimalarials, and others
  • Smoking
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Diet

Flare ups can last a few weeks or months and can subside for a long time afterwards, only to reappear later. Psoriasis is in no way contagious and cannot be spread through contact.

Since there is no known cure for psoriasis, the primary goal of treatment is long-term management to reduce the number and severity of outbreaks, which includes soothing the pain and itching, keeping skin moisturized and healthy, and dealing with dryness and scaling that comes with a flare-up as quickly as possible.

Here are some things you can do to manage psoriasis outbreaks:

  • Reduce stress
  • Exercise regularly
  • Avoid hot showers or baths, limit bathing time
  • Use heavy-moisturizing lotions and ointments after a shower to lock in moisture
  • Prevent dry skin with daily moisturizing
  • Use fragrance-free products
  • Avoid sudden temperature changes
  • Avoid scratching or irritating the skin
  • Quit smoking
  • Manage your diet

Making sure your skin is healthy, clean and moisturized, even in-between flare-ups, can reduce their frequency and severity. Daily moisturizing, stress management, and small lifestyle changes can significantly decrease your chances of having a flare-up.

talk to your doctor

Visit your medical professional for more information on eczema and psoriasis outbreaks. Only a doctor can properly diagnose you with eczema or psoriasis, and offer professional advice. The information provided here is not meant to substitute a visit to your healthcare provider, or to be taken as medical advice.

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